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Posts Tagged ‘heat map’

Latency Heat Maps in SQL*Plus

August 23rd, 2013


This is so cool !

Screen Shot 2013-05-10 at 1.13.15 PM

The above is so cool.

The graphic shows the latency heatmap of “log file sync” on Oracle displayed in SQL*Plus! SQL*Plus ?! Yes, the age old text interface to Oracle showing colored graphics.

How did I do this? All I did was type

sqlplus / as sysdba
@OraLatencyMap_event 3 "log file sync"

The script  OraLatencyMap_event was created by  , see http://externaltable.blogspot.com/2013/05/latency-heat-map-in-sqlplus-with.htm

Now if we combine Luca’s  monitoring, with the I/O throttling documeted by Frits Hoogland here https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2012/12/15/throttling-io-with-linux/ , we can really have some fun and even draw latency words:

analytics-3-heatmaps-crop

 
In the graphic at the top of the page I put lgwr in an I/O write throttle group and played with the I/O throttle.  I was running a swingbench load and at the same as throttling I/O such that latencies started off good then got worse and then back to normal.
 
The full steps are:
 

Run an auto refresh color coded heatmap on “log file sync” in sqlplus by typing

sqlplus / as sysdba
@OraLatencyMap_event 3 "log file sync"

where OraLatencyMap_event.sql and OraLatencyMap_internal.sql are  your current directory or sqlpath

Now to play with LGWR latency with cgroup throttles see

https://fritshoogland.wordpress.com/2012/12/15/throttling-io-with-linux/

# install cgroups on 2.6.24 LINUX or higher
yum intall cgroup

# setup /cgroup/blkio
grep blkio /proc/mounts || mkdir -p /cgroup/blkio ; mount -t cgroup -o blkio none /cgroup/blkio
cgcreate -g blkio:/iothrottle

# find the device you want
df -k
# my Oracle log file divice was
ls -l /dev/mapper/vg_source-lv_home
lrwxrwxrwx. 1 root root 7 May  1 21:42 /dev/mapper/vg_source-lv_home -> ../dm-2

# my device points to /dev/dm-2
ls -l /dev/dm-2
brw-rw----. 1 root disk 253, 2 May  1 21:42 /dev/dm-2

# my device  major and minor numbers are "253, 2"
# create a write throtte on this device (for read just replace "write" with "read"
# this limits it to 10 writers per second
cgset -r blkio.throttle.write_iops_device="253:2 10" iothrottle

# look for lgwr
ps -ef | grep lgwr
oracle   23165     1  0 13:35 ?        00:00:19 ora_lgwr_o1123

# put lgwr pid into throttle group
echo 23165     >  /cgroup/blkio/iothrottle/tasks

# now play with different throttles
cgset -r blkio.throttle.write_iops_device="253:2 1" iothrottle
cgset -r blkio.throttle.write_iops_device="253:2 10" iothrottle
cgset -r blkio.throttle.write_iops_device="253:2 100" iothrottle
cgset -r blkio.throttle.write_iops_device="253:2 1000" iothrottle

# if you are finished then delete the throttle control group
cgdelete  blkio:/iothrottle

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Latency heatmaps in D3 and Highcharts

August 20th, 2013


See Brendan Gregg’s blog on how important and cool heatmaps can be for showing latency information and how average latency hides what is really going on:

Now if we want to create heatmap graphics, how can we do it? Two popular web methods for displaying graphics are Highcharts and D3. Two colleges of mine whipped up some quick examples in both Highcharts and D3 to show latency heatmaps and those two examples are shown below. The data in the charts is random just for the purposes of showing examples of these graphics in actions.

Highcharts Heatmap


see code at http://jsfiddle.net/vladiweb/GNd3G/


 

D3 Heatmap


see code at
http://jsfiddle.net/eyalkaspi/YH8sw

graphics , ,